Tag Archives: paintings

Wonders, and New Colours

Monday was a contrast to the weekend. After a splendid couple of days in the mountains, camping in a wild place and achieving my objectives of ascending Ben Vorlich and Stuc a Chroin, I had a day at the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh to visit the “Ages of Wonder” exhibition of Scottish art.

I had carried a small box of watercolours, some of the pans I’ve had since I was in my late teens, before the age of home computers, when the only mobile phones were on Star Trek! My plan had been to use them on the mountain but the combination of strong, cold wind and freezing air with the exhilaration and desire for movement meant that I only made a couple of quick pencil sketches from the summit.  It was only on the walk out, later on, that I was struck in the sunset by the glowing quality of the land and, more subtly, sky and attempted to capture something of this with the paints; partially successful.

Relaxing in cafes and in the gallery, I felt the urge to sketch and, later found the superb Greyfriars Art Shop, in Dundas Street, where I found both a type of palette that I’d seen in a demonstration recently and decided to try some new colours from tubes rather than pans, to allow me to use the paint in greater density than is easy with pans.  The same demonstration left me feeling re-inspired to explore watercolours again, for their qualities and also the relative ease of use in the typically awkward situations I end up painting in, even at home; it’s why I do not use oils, despite several people urging me to do so, it’s just not practical in my present situation.

It’s reminded me that I really enjoy sketching, both with pencil and pen, and like what can be achieved with watercolours, even if I have so far largely failed to get the kind of results I would really like.

Here are some of them.  I may write more in due course about the exhibition and my impressions of some of the works, but I have an early start in the morning and need to sleep soon… and there is a heap of dull but necessary paperwork to be sorted…. I hope for a stormy weekend in which to deal with it and leave me feeling I can play more freely… self-created inefficiency for which I alone am responsible.

I hope you like the sketches.

Advertisements

Scotland – storms and light

It has been a wild week: low cloud, strong to gale force winds, regular bands of rain or slushy snow,  punctuated by brilliant sparkling sunshine and, on the last day, luminous rainbows framing mountains that I have not made time to climb on this journey.

On the way north, I caught the last ferry of the day, just, to the isle of Mull, which was hiding under a thick grey winter blanket with a cold wind raising a small choppy swell.

20170228_072201

I have achieved all but two of the main objectives that I had for this half-term break. I have spent time with friends not seen for too long, explored some new places, slept under stars and stormy nights in my oldest tent and on a boat, immersed myself briefly in the sea and made a number of paint sketches on most days. I had intended to paint more outside, but the general wetness of everything meant that the car was my main studio, if only to prevent the sketchbook from disintegrating.

Inspired by a recent presentation to the Wolverhampton Society of Artists, I had bought a brown card sketch book to experiment with painting quickly on a nearly mid-toned ground. I have enjoyed the results, in part because I  tried to loosen up my painting and catch impressions rather than details.

20170228_072316

At one place, the enigmatic Clava Cairns near Culloden, I felt a figurative sketch wouldn’t work. Instead I followed a more expressive approach, a response to what I perceived in the place: the sense of the geographical location, the feeling of a flow of something through the site,  the sense of presence I felt standing near some of the cairns and upright stones.

20170228_072453

I’ve been able to get used to using my reduced palette of acrylics in the outdoors or in the car, refinishing the logistics of deploying and stowing paints, water and a brush or two; all good practice for a possible trip further afield around Easter.

Inspirational Workshopping

Until yesterday, I had never tried the monoprint technique. I had not really understood the advantages and potential of this approach until the workshop, run by Art North Wales at the Trigonos centre in Nantlle.

We had a busy, productive and inspiring day, everybody producing very different and interesting work, with a vibrant atmosphere of playful exploration in the room as people rolled out ink and paints and experimented with paper, card, natural materials, collaging and more to try out new ways of image making.

For myself, I am trying to take a more free and loose style in my painting and drawing, especially in my landscape work.  After the first demonstration, I started to get a flood of ideas for possible ways of using this to achieve a shift in my paintings.

I started working on backgrounds, inspired by the wonderful autumnal colours that are persisting here and the layers of colours and forms in these Snowdonia valleys between the dramatic ridges.  Leaves and  stems from the grounds provided a set of printing medial to add layers to the pictures and I tried making multiple impressions, each one very different, as is the nature of monoprinting.  The results are below, I have been inspired and will be looking at how I can incorporate some of these methods into my work…

2016-11-07-13.41.32.jpg.jpeg

Autumn Change 1

2016-11-07-13.42.04.jpg.jpeg

Autumn Change 3

2016-11-07-13.42.44.jpg.jpeg

Autumn Change 2

2016-11-07-13.43.08.jpg.jpeg

Autumn Change 4

2016-11-07-13.44.35.jpg.jpeg

Ivy 1

2016-11-07-13.44.03.jpg.jpeg

Ivy 2

2016-11-07-13.43.33.jpg.jpeg

Ivy 3

2016-11-07-13.46.53.jpg.jpeg

Nantlle rain

2016-11-07-13.47.52.jpg.jpeg

Nantlle 1

2016-11-07-13.47.29.jpg.jpeg

Nantlle 2

 

“Into an old, new land”

Here is a preview of a new landscape painting, inspired by recent experiences in Scotland as dramatic rain clouds rolled in over Creag Meagaidh , as well as other things seen in the Cairngorms, earlier in the year.  Unusually, for me, it combines elements from several experiences. This and other acrylic works are on the updated Acrylic paintings page.

2016 a changing land w3

Into an old, new land – acrylic on canvas 76x51cm 2016

The inspiration for this painting ‘boiled up’ for me in the wake of the UK’s referendum on EU membership, added to what transpired to be a fruitless journey at short notice.  I felt the result in a very personal way that surprised me; I spoke to others who said the same. As the train rolled south on the day of the result, I felt I was returning to a land that was less home, more foreign, to me now.  The heaviness of the greys in the clouds, which I find beautiful and fascinating to watch, along with the strong contrasts and feeling of compression of the mountains, the gaps of light offering possible escape routes from the crushing presence of the rain-bearing masses.. all these had a resonance for me in the present situation.

I may add some finishing work to this, though not a great deal, it is essentially ‘done’.  I feel the sense of danger but also opportunity that changes bring; it is not an easy time.

 

After Easter

I’ve been staying with friends whom I haven’t seen for about four years. They have the luxury of a real studio and invited me to do some painting this morning. I was given a free rein with acrylics and a few brushes and objects to select, plus a mug of good strong coffee…
I had an hour before the train. 
So, first a quick still life, then a rapid little self portrait study on a small pad of watercolour paper to use up some spare paint from the palette:

image

image

Rijksmuseum – your own private collection!

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has added a great feature to its website in the form of Rijksstudios: this is mine so far –  https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/nl/rijksstudio/160668–chris-terrell/verzamelingen

You can save details as well as entire images of works from their collection and download good quality images, order reproductions and other good features that enhance access to a superb collection of great art.  You can choose the language too.  I’ll try the phone app later and on my next visit to the museum, planned for August.

I don’t yet know whether any UK galleries or museums are doing this, a commendable idea and a great opportunity to explore the collection before and after a visit.

Het melkmeisje – Johannes Vermeer