Author Archives: surfsensei

I imagine…

Image and words, “locked down” in body but not in mind:

I imagine…
Opening the doors again
Stepping out into air
And sunlight,
The song of birds whose
Voices are grown stronger
From being allowed
The space in which to sing.

I imagine…
Carrying my boat to the water,
Launching on the flood tide
Riding sparkling waves and
Surprising the seals who thought
We’d gone away, to plunder
And pollute another, distant, ocean.

I imagine…
With you, and you and you..
Painting a new view,
Of health, home and wealth
For each of us, by right of simply
Being here, the soil a human needs
To grow and bear our natural fruit.

I imagine…
Embracing you again and
Walking, hand in hand,
Through Autumn leaves,
To join the gathering of folk
And, together, round the fire
Fuelled with old and rotten
Furniture we’ve kept too long,
Begin our steps towards,
To borrow better words,
The early days of a better nation.

Chris Terrell – April 2020

Easter

I’ve been away from paint and canvas for a while, at least nine months, I think. Apart from sketches in my little sketchbook, that is. My creative energies have largely been occupied with the gestation and birth of a kayak, plus paddles and now some associated equipment that I have had to make specifically for it. The boat has been launched and passed initial trials, then came the lockdown and all I can do for now is plan trips and do land-based versions of emergency drills; patience, it will pass and the sea remains.

Today, Easter Monday, I managed at last to put oil paint onto a small canvas, another tiny square one. I like these, it’s possible to complete a painting in a morning if I wish and can work successfully “wet-in-wet”. Although it was bright and sunny, the air was cold, but I was able to paint outside, dressed as for a winter’s day. Plein Air painting was a nice bonus.

The landlord’s shed opposite my wee cottage has acquired some character over the years and gets some good light angles during the mid- to late-morning, now that the sun is high enough again to illuminate the garden properly.

I’ll put up some photos of the recent sketchbook work in a while. Meantime, best wishes to you for health, mental stability and hope in this time of disruption and much tragedy, and here’s today’s painting:

1145 Shed Oil on Canvas 10 x 10cm

The Tide will turn…

I’m taking the opportunity, during my daily walk or cycle exercise excursion, to explore some corners of my local area and, if I can , to ensure I make at least one sketch and/or photograph. I’ve been too occupied by making a kayak in the last few months up until January to do much 2-d art but my inspiration is returning, especially during this period of relative confinement.

A few years ago, I made a short series of edited images with words for the international project “A Book About Death” and related themes, which I will post in due course. It’s been a while but I like working with image-editing software to create something new as a digital collage.

Here, words and image :

Photograph (c) Chris Terrell 2020 Photo and text "The Tide will turn"

I wish you all well, mentally as well as physically.

Strange Lights, Two Suns.

The mountains were calling, today, with a good layer of recent snow for well over a week now and a reasonable weather forecast. I packed my gear and made an early start, before dawn, driving up to Loch Tay and the Scottish National Trust car park between Ben Lawers and Tarmachan ridge.

The first part of the ascent was in bright morning sunshine, only one other person already ahead of me. As I neared the upper slopes of Beinn Ghlas, the forecast cloud began to come in, subtly at first, a light haze that scattered the sunlight in strange ways and produced a second sun at one point, the reflection from Loch Tay brighter than the “real” one.

Then I was into a near whiteout for the next few hours, a cold northerly wind making it a “proper” winter day and giving me practice at navigating in challenging optical conditions, the uniform light making it almost impossible to judge scale and distance until very close to an object; edges and references vanish and you have to take care not to walk over a concealed drop.

It was too cold for pushing the sketching envelope today but I did manage a quick sketch to back-up the photos I took – I wanted to draw as well as shoot, the action of sketching helps to capture and focus my mind upon what I am seeing/perceiving/feeling… what is the experience I am having? I now have some material and ideas for a future painting or at least study. Whan I will do that i am not sure; I am engaged in making with wood in 3-D at present. I have, however, had a genuinely “quality mountain day”, a set of memorable walking and visual experiences that are adding to the stock of mental material.

I’ll add a photo of the sketch later.

It’s time for an early night.

Into a third dimension

It’s been a while since my last post and this is merely a quick update as I’m in a very busy period at present, with work and other activities that are very much about laying the foundations for steps forward, which is all the level of detail I’ll put here for now.

Artistically, it’s been a quiet few months, I’ve been out a lot with the local Canoe Club, enjoying trips and company while refining my skills and building my experience, attending training courses to upgrade my outdoor qualifications and making things, especially in wood. I am drafting a new set of pages on this site which will both show some of the previous artefacts that I’ve designed and made in the last few years and will show the recent projects, including a big one I’ve just taken the first steps in: making myself a sea-kayak – a wooden frame with a nylon cloth skin. I’ll blog the build as I am able to make each of the steps, over the next few months.

Rhum, from the campsite near Arisaig

For now, my creativity is mostly channelled into three dimensions and objects that are both useful and, at least to me, aesthetically pleasing.

More, including photos, soon.

Landscape in oil – new painting.

The trouble with Summer, for me, is that it is in many ways the hardest time for me to get down to any painting. Pleasant weather and long days, especially here in Scotland, make for good plein-air painting conditions, for sure, but also for walking, cycling, kayaking and canoeing, all of which are important activities for me, especially as I am in the process of updating my outdoor qualifications; steps for a shift in direction.

I’ve been working in small stages on a small landscape in oils, the second in what I intend will be a series of mostly Scottish landscapes. This weekend I’ve chosen more restful activities than usual of late and have finished this one.

Morning Peaks – Ben Lawers & An Stuc from Meall Garbh
Oil on Canvas Board 30.5 x 25.4 cm (12″ x 10″)

The scene was among the literal and emotional high points of an overnight trip to the Loch Tay area to make an ascent and traverse of the Ben Lawers and neighbouring peaks. I had walked in along tracks to a fine bivvy spot beneath the eastern end of the ridge and made a dawn start on a clear, cool morning. It was a superb day, hazy but spacious and with a cold wind that kept me a comfortable temperature while carrying a pack up hill.

From Meall Garbh there is a steep descent to the bealach (saddle or pass) and a steeper, scrambling, ascent up An Stuc; a few moments of concentration needed to make moves with a full pack to interfere with my balance. This was the best direction from which to tackle this peak while carrying a load. It was helpful to see the first human being of the day, ahead of me and travelling light up what looks a near-impenetrable wall from the angle of the bealach.

It was a day for taking photographs, too chilly to sit comfortably for long to sketch in exposed viewpoints and, in any case, I was full of the urge to move and maintain a good speed over this wonderful set of hills; my mind and body were for moving.

I reached Ben Lawers summit around 1130, meeting the first people arriving at the top that morning and feeling good to have made full use of the daylight. After this, I slowed my pace, sat in sheltered spots and lingered in the bright light and feeling of space, hesitant to descend to the car park and “complete” my adventure. I had achieved a walk that I had wanted to do since my first ascent and visit to this part of Scotland a few years ago and was in no rush to drive home.

I’ve had to work mostly from the photos I took that day as a reference, a prompt for refreshing the experience of the place, rather than a subject to try to copy, although the forms and light are important elements for me. I am not ready to abstract this too much to allow a more expressive interpretation, though this formed a stage in preparatory thumbnails.

The picture is resting, now, I’m happy it’s finished. I have a list of others to choose from to begin soon. More as it happens… Have a good week.